Category Archives: News

Me. I Am Mariah… The Elusive Chanteuse Hits Aspen Dispensary

Me. I Am Mariah… The Elusive Chanteuse Hits Aspen Dispensary

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Recommended article: The Guardian’s Summary of Julian Assange’s Interview Went Viral and Was Completely False.

Published at Tue, 03 Jan 2017 17:45:40 +0000

Medicinal CBD now OK in UK

Medicinal CBD now OK in UK

Products containing cannabidiol (CBD) used for medical purposes are now officially classed as medicines in the United Kingdom.

The Medicines & Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) said it had looked at CBD because a number of manufacturing companies had been making “overt medicinal claims” about products.

Gerald Heddel, director of inspection and enforcement at the agency, told Sky News: “The change really came about with us offering an opinion that CBD is in fact a medicine, and that opinion was based on the fact that we noted that people were making some quite stark claims about serious diseases that could be treated with CBD.”

He said that a review of the evidence showed that “it was clear that people are using this product with the understandable belief that it will actually help”.

— Read the full story by Sarah Hajibagheri at Sky News

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Recommended article: The Guardian’s Summary of Julian Assange’s Interview Went Viral and Was Completely False.
Published at Mon, 02 Jan 2017 23:51:15 +0000

Emerald Health Adopts Advance Notice Policy

Emerald Health Adopts Advance Notice Policy

Emerald Health Therapeutics Inc. (TSXV: EMH) announces the adoption by its board of directors of an advance notice policy (the “Advance Notice Policy”) regarding director elections.

The purpose of the Advance Notice Policy is to provide a clear process for the shareholders, directors and management to follow when nominating directors of the Company. Such a policy will ensure that shareholders receive adequate notice of director nominations and sufficient information regarding all director nominees and to allow shareholders to register an informed vote after having been afforded reasonable time for appropriate deliberation.

The Advance Notice Policy, among other things, includes a provision that requires advance notice to the Company in certain circumstances where nominations of persons for election to the board of directors are made by shareholders of the Company. This Advance Notice Policy also sets a deadline by which director nominations must be submitted to the Company prior to any annual general or special meeting of the shareholders and also sets out the required information that must be included in the notice to the Company. No person will be eligible for election as a director of the Company unless nominated in accordance with the Advance Notice Policy.

In the case of an annual general meeting of the shareholders, notice to the Company must be made not less than 35 days and not more than 65 days prior to the date of the annual general meeting. If the annual general meeting is being held on a date that is less than 50 days following the date on which the first public announcement of the meeting was made, notice may be made not later than the close of business on the 10th day following such public announcement.

In the case of a special meeting of shareholders (which is not also an annual general meeting) called for the purpose of electing directors, notice to the Company must be made not later than the close of business on the 15th day following the day on which the first public announcement of the date of the special meeting was made. Notwithstanding the foregoing, the board of directors may, in its sole discretion, waive any requirement of the Advance Notice Policy.

The Advance Notice Policy is now in effect and will apply in connection with the Company’s next annual general meeting (the “Shareholders’ Meeting”). The Company intends to seek shareholder approval and ratification of the Advance Notice Policy at the Shareholders’ Meeting. If the Advance Notice Policy is not ratified by ordinary resolution of the Company’s shareholders at the Shareholders’ Meeting, then it will terminate and be void and of no further force or effect following the termination of the Shareholders’ Meeting.

A full description of the Advance Notice Policy will be contained in the information circular to be prepared for the Shareholders’ Meeting and mailed to the Company’s shareholders. A copy of the Advance Notice Policy is available on SEDAR under the Company’s profile at www.sedar.com

ON BEHALF OF THE BOARD

Jim Heppell

Lead Director

Emerald Health Therapeutics Inc.

Emerald Health Therapeutics wholly owns Emerald Health Botanicals, which has been granted licenses under the Access to Cannabis for Medical Purposes Regulations to sell and cultivate medical cannabis, and to produce and sell medical cannabis oils in Canada.

Neither the TSX Venture Exchange nor its Regulation Services Provider (as that term is defined in the policies of the TSX Venture Exchange) accepts responsibility for the adequacy or accuracy of this release.

SOURCE Emerald Health Therapeutics, Inc.

For further information: Sandy Pratt, CFO, Emerald Health Therapeutics, P: 250-818-9838, E: invest@emerald.care
Published at Mon, 19 Dec 2016 20:06:52 +0000

Cannabis Culture co-owner Jodie Emery arrested at Montreal hotel

Cannabis Culture co-owner Jodie Emery arrested at Montreal hotel

Shortly after her husband Marc was arrested by Montreal police at a newly opened dispensary in the Plateau neighbourhood, Cannabis Culture co-owner Jodie Emery was also taken away in handcuffs from her hotel.

Marc Emery is due to appear in court today (Dec. 17) after his arrest along with nine others last night during raids on six of his new recreational cannabis shops in Montreal.

Nine of those arrested were released on a promise to appear, but the self-styled Prince of Pot refused to sign. He faces charges of trafficking, possession for the purposes of trafficking, and conspiracy.

The Cannabis Culture Twitter account announced that, while sales were suspended, they would be giving away from joints at their storefronts at 1863 Rue Amherst and 2200 Ave de Mont-Royal Est.

The federal government is expected to table legislation legalizing cannabis in early 2017, but current federal laws still prohibit the sale of recreational marijuana.

Published at Sat, 17 Dec 2016 19:56:34 +0000

Oregon marijuana ads flourish on Craigslist

Oregon marijuana ads flourish on Craigslist

The Columbian / Associated Press

It started with making marijuana products at home for herself and her husband. Then, she thought, “People might buy these.”

The woman, who lives in Keizer, figured she could make money off a medical marijuana-filled, holiday-themed gift box.

The gift box had pot-infused body butter (“to rub on achy muscles”), massage oil (“perfect for the bedroom”), a 4-by-5 inch Rice Krispie edible and other treats. She makes it all herself and is proud of the body butter. She said it helped her mom’s foot arthritis.

The box costs $100. “I just thought it’d be a fun thing for Christmas,” she said.

She posted an ad for the pack, as many have done for marijuana in Oregon, through the online bazaar Craigslist.

As Oregon growers, processors and dispensaries in the legal cannabis business navigate state regulations and shortages on the marketplace, some people are looking to the online shopping website as an outlet for moving their pot.

Craigslist ads for marijuana are flourishing in the state, whether barterers want to trade for money or goods.

Here’s a sample of posts the Statesman Journal found on the website: The holiday basket. Half an ounce of buds for $40 of groceries in Estacada. And in one instance, a Lebanon Craigslist user writes they will trade “a few ounces of marijuana” for three Hatchimal toys, which have been highly coveted this holiday season.

That user, who did not give their name, said in an email the toys were for their kids.

“I don’t think it should be illegal to barter marijuana now that it’s legal,” the user said. “I mean that’s the same as saying people that have a hunting (license) can’t trade or sell some of their meat to people for something they need or want.”

Even though Oregon has legalized marijuana, selling it online is against the law.

Case in point: Oregon State Police cited Jason Owen, of Sandy, after he tried to trade 1 pound of marijuana for a snowmobile in October.

A state trooper owned the rig and met with Owen after consulting other law enforcement officials. Police cited the 29-year-old for possession and delivery of marijuana. In his vehicle, Owen had 1 1/2 pounds of marijuana.

“Marijuana sales need to occur at an approved dispensary per statute,” said Cpt. Bill Fugate, a spokesman for the State Police. That means the Oregon Liquor Control Commission or Oregon Health Authority has to approve the dispensary.

Oregon law enforcement officials call for relaxed drug-possession punishments

In September, the Oregon Association Chiefs of Police and the Oregon State Sheriffs’ Association called for “a more thoughtful approach to drug possession when it is the only crime committed.”

The associations said there should be more treatment options for drug possession-related crimes, and there should be fewer felony charges handed out; they should be treated as misdemeanors.

Paige Clarkson, trial team leader for the Marion County Attorney’s Office drug team, said she didn’t know of any investigations on Craigslist marijuana sales. She said there would have to be an investigation before the District Attorney’s office would give a response.

Online pot: It’s not like selling a sweater on Etsy

Under Oregon law, it’s legal for people 21 years of age or older to possess up to a certain amount of recreational pot. But that doesn’t mean they can peddle it online like a knitted sweater.

“No, you can’t sell marijuana on Craigslist,” said Mark Pettinger, a spokesperson for the OLCC, which regulates recreational sales.

In fact, even Craigslist rules don’t allow the sale of “prescription drugs, medical devices; controlled substances and related items,” or “any good, service, or content that violates the law or legal rights of others.”

Pettinger said you can gift marijuana, but there can’t be money involved. The commission has said that asking for “donations” is also prohibited, though that appears to be a popular tack with some Craigslist users.

For carded medical marijuana users, the rules are a little different but still strict.

The state allows transfer of medical marijuana between carded patients and other specific entities. The path of transfer for medical marijuana is “highly regulated” and “explicitly defined,” said Chris Westfall, the compliance unit manager with the Oregon Health Authority.

“This is not like selling your used, out-of-date furniture,” he said.

One patient can exchange their products with another patient “for no financial consideration,” according to a Health Authority document provided by Westfall.

When shown the ad for the holiday gift box, Westfall said: “The example your link points to is certainly not by someone registered with (the Oregon medical marijuana program) as a processor or a dispensary.

“None of the items displayed are properly labeled or tested, and, by the image and the narrative explanation of one Krispy being sufficient for multiple people, they would exceed the concentration limits,” he said.

The seller said she has made some $150 on her products so far.

Asked if she knew about the rules around selling marijuana on Craigslist, she said: “Yeah, I know it’s kind of a gray area.”

The Columbian / Associated Press

It started with making marijuana products at home for herself and her husband. Then, she thought, “People might buy these.”

The woman, who lives in Keizer, figured she could make money off a medical marijuana-filled, holiday-themed gift box.

The gift box had pot-infused body butter (“to rub on achy muscles”), massage oil (“perfect for the bedroom”), a 4-by-5 inch Rice Krispie edible and other treats. She makes it all herself and is proud of the body butter. She said it helped her mom’s foot arthritis.

The box costs $100. “I just thought it’d be a fun thing for Christmas,” she said.

She posted an ad for the pack, as many have done for marijuana in Oregon, through the online bazaar Craigslist.

As Oregon growers, processors and dispensaries in the legal cannabis business navigate state regulations and shortages on the marketplace, some people are looking to the online shopping website as an outlet for moving their pot.

Craigslist ads for marijuana are flourishing in the state, whether barterers want to trade for money or goods.

Here’s a sample of posts the Statesman Journal found on the website: The holiday basket. Half an ounce of buds for $40 of groceries in Estacada. And in one instance, a Lebanon Craigslist user writes they will trade “a few ounces of marijuana” for three Hatchimal toys, which have been highly coveted this holiday season.

That user, who did not give their name, said in an email the toys were for their kids.

“I don’t think it should be illegal to barter marijuana now that it’s legal,” the user said. “I mean that’s the same as saying people that have a hunting (license) can’t trade or sell some of their meat to people for something they need or want.”

Even though Oregon has legalized marijuana, selling it online is against the law.

Case in point: Oregon State Police cited Jason Owen, of Sandy, after he tried to trade 1 pound of marijuana for a snowmobile in October.

A state trooper owned the rig and met with Owen after consulting other law enforcement officials. Police cited the 29-year-old for possession and delivery of marijuana. In his vehicle, Owen had 1 1/2 pounds of marijuana.

“Marijuana sales need to occur at an approved dispensary per statute,” said Cpt. Bill Fugate, a spokesman for the State Police. That means the Oregon Liquor Control Commission or Oregon Health Authority has to approve the dispensary.

Oregon law enforcement officials call for relaxed drug-possession punishments

In September, the Oregon Association Chiefs of Police and the Oregon State Sheriffs’ Association called for “a more thoughtful approach to drug possession when it is the only crime committed.”

The associations said there should be more treatment options for drug possession-related crimes, and there should be fewer felony charges handed out; they should be treated as misdemeanors.

Paige Clarkson, trial team leader for the Marion County Attorney’s Office drug team, said she didn’t know of any investigations on Craigslist marijuana sales. She said there would have to be an investigation before the District Attorney’s office would give a response.

Online pot: It’s not like selling a sweater on Etsy

Under Oregon law, it’s legal for people 21 years of age or older to possess up to a certain amount of recreational pot. But that doesn’t mean they can peddle it online like a knitted sweater.

“No, you can’t sell marijuana on Craigslist,” said Mark Pettinger, a spokesperson for the OLCC, which regulates recreational sales.

In fact, even Craigslist rules don’t allow the sale of “prescription drugs, medical devices; controlled substances and related items,” or “any good, service, or content that violates the law or legal rights of others.”

Pettinger said you can gift marijuana, but there can’t be money involved. The commission has said that asking for “donations” is also prohibited, though that appears to be a popular tack with some Craigslist users.

For carded medical marijuana users, the rules are a little different but still strict.

The state allows transfer of medical marijuana between carded patients and other specific entities. The path of transfer for medical marijuana is “highly regulated” and “explicitly defined,” said Chris Westfall, the compliance unit manager with the Oregon Health Authority.

“This is not like selling your used, out-of-date furniture,” he said.

One patient can exchange their products with another patient “for no financial consideration,” according to a Health Authority document provided by Westfall.

When shown the ad for the holiday gift box, Westfall said: “The example your link points to is certainly not by someone registered with (the Oregon medical marijuana program) as a processor or a dispensary.

“None of the items displayed are properly labeled or tested, and, by the image and the narrative explanation of one Krispy being sufficient for multiple people, they would exceed the concentration limits,” he said.

The seller said she has made some $150 on her products so far.

Asked if she knew about the rules around selling marijuana on Craigslist, she said: “Yeah, I know it’s kind of a gray area.”

Published at Mon, 12 Dec 2016 17:34:09 +0000

Canadian task force wants to legalize pot

Canadian task force wants to legalize pot

The Columbian / Associated Press

TORONTO — Canada’s government said Tuesday it would study a federal task force’s recommendation that Canadians over 18 years old be allowed to buy marijuana for recreational purposes and would announce new laws in the spring that would legalize pot.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has long promised to legalize recreational pot sales and use. If passed, Canada would be the largest developed country to end prohibition of recreational marijuana. Voters in California, Massachusetts, Maine and Nevada voted Nov. 8 to approve the use of recreational marijuana, joining Colorado, Washington, Oregon and Alaska, where it had previously been legalized.

The marijuana task force report, headed by former Canadian Liberal Health Minister Anne McLellan, recommended that adults could carry up to 30 grams for recreational purpose and grow up to four plants. It also recommended that higher-potency pot be taxed at a higher rate than weaker strains. And said recreational marijuana should not be sold in the same location as alcohol or tobacco. Under the proposals, alcohol-free cannabis lounges would be allowed.

Published at Wed, 14 Dec 2016 01:47:50 +0000

Everything You Need To Know About THC

Everything You Need To Know About THC

Cannabis is fast becoming accepted in different places around the globe. Over the past three years, we’ve seen more states that created medical cannabis laws. That’s despite the fact that cannabis is still federally illegal. With growing acceptance of cannabis, it’s time that we become educated about what the plant can really do.

THC is the main cannabinoid responsible for the plant’s psychoactive effects. But is this everything you need to know about this cannabinoid? How does it work? What are the benefits that make it so popular? Is it even dangerous to our health?

What is delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol?

THC is found in female cannabis flowers. Though male cannabis plants also produce a small amount of THC, it usually doesn’t produce sufficient amount that can get people’s attention. Cannabinoids are produced by cannabis plants as secondary metabolites. It simply means that it doesn’t have any role in its growth and other primary functions.

Though it lacks in the role regarding primary functions of the plant, research suggests that these secondary metabolites have a role in protecting the plant from pathogens and herbivores. On the part of THC, it is known for its anti-microbial properties. In fact, when ingested, its antimicrobial properties even work wonders for humans. These secondary metabolites are known to function in lieu of an internal immune system.

History of THC

THC was first discovered in the 1960s by Raphael Mechaoulam. The time he extracted THC for the first time triggered a revolution of scientific inquiry to what the cannabinoid can do. In the year 2000, Dr. Raphael Mechoulam was given the Israel Prize, an award given to those who went beyond their field.

But of course, research didn’t come easy for Mechaoulam. The first problem he encountered was where to obtain his supply of cannabis for research? Fortunately, he had the Israel Police for that. He was given a five-kilo stash which enabled him to make the necessary progress for his studies.

Though it was discovered in the 60s, it wasn’t until 80s when we found out that THC actually binds in the brain. Allyn Howlett discovered that THC binds itself in areas such as the hippocampus, frontal cortex, and cerebellum. Each site has some cannabinoid receptors which are part of the body’s endocannabinoid system. This further expanded our understanding how THC works in the body. It explained a lot how THC is used in today’s medical field. 

The endocannabinoid system

To appreciate how THC and other cannabinoids work, it is important first to have an understanding of the endocannabinoid system. For starters, there are two types of cannabinoid receptors. The body has CB1 and CB2 receptors. This is where cannabinoids such as CBD and THC latch.

So why does the body have an endocannabinoid system in the first place? It’s because the body produces cannabinoids internally. The endocannabinoid system is responsible for keeping the body’s ability to fight infection, control our mood and control other physiologic functions such as sleep. Basically, its function is to promote homeostasis to the body.

What made THC special?

What makes THC special and useful? And why does it have psychoactive effects? You can blame the molecular structure of the cannabinoid for that. Because of the cannabinoid’s structure, it simply fits into the different receptors of the endocannabinoid system including the ones found in the brain. 

According to research, THC has a higher tendency to latch on CB1 receptors found in the brain. This is responsible for the psychoactive effects of the cannabinoid. The most common medical use of THC is its ability to modulate pain. It is also believed that it has an effect in helping the body’s inflammatory response.

Anandamide

The body can produce cannabinoids that can also latch in the cannabinoid receptors found in the body. The body can create a THC-like substance called anandamide. Originally, anandamide helps in the body’s ability to forget. How exactly is this helpful? What this endocannabinoid does is to screen all the clutter and just let you remember the important things.

Understanding the function of anandamide is crucial in learning about the possible use of THC in conditions such as PTSD. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder is a condition wherein a person can’t overcome negative thoughts from a particular event.

So why consume THC when you have anandamide that is almost the same as THC? The key difference between the naturally occurring cannabinoid and THC is the ability of the latter to last longer. Anandamide is known to a breakdown in just a few minutes once it binds to cells. THC, on the other hand, can last for days in the body.

Anandamide, THC, and CBD

CBD is another cannabinoid that is becoming just as popular as THC. CBD gained mainstream popularity after CBD based cannabis were able to help cure children suffering from Dravet Syndrome, a rare case of epilepsy that causes seizures of over 100 episodes in one day.

How exactly does CBD work? CBD is a different type of cannabinoid. Unlike THC that acts on cannabinoid receptors, it stops the enzyme fatty acid amide hydroxyls (FAAH). This enzyme is the one responsible for breaking down anandamide. With fewer cannabinoid receptors where THC could latch, CBD has also been known to decrease the intoxicating effects of THC.  The problem with CBD-only medical cannabis laws is the fact that it undermines the synergistic effects with other cannabinoids and terpenes.

Pain medication

One of the main uses of THC-rich cannabis strains is for pain relief. Unlike narcotic based products, cannabis is a far safer option as an analgesic. According to studies, THC can block pain signals in the central nervous system. This means that it can be used to help treat neuropathic pain.

What makes it better than other pain medication? Researchers from Australian National Drug and Alcohol Center believed discovered that cannabis is a better option than opioid pain medication in treating chronic pain.

In addition to this, there’s no known overdose caused by cannabis. It is a common problem that you’ll eventually need a higher dose as you take opioid medication. This alarming problem increased the number of people in the US who suffered from opioid overdose.

And why doesn’t cannabis cause fatal side effects? The location of cannabinoid receptors is mainly located in parts of the brain that has nothing to do with breathing, and heart rate.

Anti-emetic

THC is also known as an anti-emetic. Since the 1980s, cannabis has been used to help patients undergoing chemotherapy. However, there have been some problems that people experienced using THC. For instance, how do people avoid getting high? Today, Marinol, a synthetic form of THC, is being used in some places where you THC or cannabis is still illegal. 

Glaucoma

Glaucoma affects around 3 million Americans. This condition, if remained untreated, could lead towards blindness. THC has been discovered to help patients suffering from glaucoma by reducing intraocular pressure potentially. However, there’s a need for further research given the need for THC to be present constantly to have its benefits.

Possible Cons of THC and Cannabis

HC’s biggest roadblock towards legalization is its effects on the brain. This is also the reason why CBD has been the cannabinoid that re-opened mainstream interest to legalize cannabis. In addition to this, there are some studies that suggest that THC can predispose you to have an earlier onset of the psychotic disorder.

Just like any other substance that is abused, cannabis may require a larger dose if used in a regular manner. But of course, it isn’t as bad as other substances. Getting a tolerance break from cannabis is easier than other substances to shy away from. All you need to do is to simply keep yourself busy such as exercises, and you are ready to go. 

What’s next for THC and Cannabis?

Cannabis today is considered schedule 1 substance. As a schedule 1 substance, it means that it is federally illegal. It is considered not to have any medical value and is highly addictive. Is THC’s psychoactive effect giving cannabis a bad name?

If you’ll read the research regarding cannabis, it has some medical benefits that are worth looking into. Despite THC’s psychoactive effects, it still has some benefits to the body which can compete with other drugs currently in the market.

There are state laws that have singled out CBD in their medical cannabis law. Though it sounds good that a cannabinoid is accepted and recognized for its medical purpose, THC’s overall benefits are not yet fully explored, given rules that exist towards cannabis.

Conclusion

There’s a shift regarding popular opinion when it comes to cannabis. Today, support for cannabis has reached an all-time high. It has even been reported that 58% of Americans are now for having a law to legalize cannabis.

As a result of this clamor, despite being federally illegal, states have made the necessary efforts in creating cannabis laws to address the demand for medical cannabis. The United Nations is also about to re-evaluate international drug laws.

Can this lead towards re-scheduling the substance? Could it be the perfect time to do more research to fully understand the potential benefits of THC and other cannabinoids?

 

Published at Tue, 25 Oct 2016 12:38:12 +0000

Texas border cops boast of pot bust

Texas border cops boast of pot bust

It’s been one month since the number of American states that allow recreational cannabis use grew to eight, along with the District of Columbia, after the federal election and yet gung-ho border patrol agents show little sign of slowing down their war on pot.

The U.S. Customs and Border Protection boasted online yesterday about apprehending two people in a Chevrolet Suburban stuffed with cannabis after it was seen speeding near Mission, Texas. Border patrol agents and state troopers, with assistance from a helicopter from Air and Marine Operations, gave chase and the two people were arrested after attempting to flee on foot.

They reportedly found 48 bundles of cannabis, weighing 558 kilos (1,230 lbs), inside the SUV with an estimated value of nearly $1 million USD.

“The public is encouraged to take a stand against crime in their communities and to help save lives by reporting suspicious activity,” they added in the press release announcing the arrests.

Published at Fri, 09 Dec 2016 22:23:55 +0000

Budzilla is back in original Vancouver location

Budzilla is back in original Vancouver location

Like its namesake Godzilla of monster movie fame, Budzilla knows a thing or two about battling a city.

In this case the city of Vancouver rather than Tokyo, Osaka or San Francisco.

It’s been half a year since the bustling East Van business specializing in edible cannabis products was locked out by its nervous landlord on July 12, but owner Rejean Houle says he expects to re-eopen the original location at 2267 Kingsway by Dec. 12.

“When I came back into the store a couple of days ago, it was like a time warp because we were in summer mode and barbecue season back then” said Houle in a phone interview Friday. “We are actually open now but we are mostly doing renovations and also updating equipment and cleaning up six months’ worth of dust.”

The problems with his landlord began after Houle was denied a business license.

“The city of Vancouver started issuing fines [to unlicensed dispensaries] and the landlord got so freaked out and, coupled with the fact they had sent them the letter of refusal for us getting us a business license, that was enough for the landlord to terminate our lease.”

He successfully appealed the city’s decision in October by going through the Board of Variance.

Budzilla Dispensary Clinic was originally denied a chance to go through the city’s licensing system after losing out in the “de-clustering” process set up by officials to determine which applicant will advance when more than two dispensaries are within 300 metres of one another. Houle’s application received more demerit points than another applicant in the area that had not yet opened at the time. Houle received 17 demerits for his application, including 10 for operating as a for-profit business and three for doing work on the space without a permit. Budzilla was also given four demerits for having a “location considered a problem premise” by the Vancouver Police Department.

The other dispensary ultimately withdrew its application.

“After the Board of Variance cleared us, we had to make basically as legal as possible. So everything needs to be spelled out, every word needs to be scrutinized because it is legalese, so it took since the Board of Variance until now be able to secure the termination of the previous lease.”

Houle said he spent roughly a quarter of a million dollars fighting the decision while juggling other projects, including running the cafe-style Budzilla Skylounge a few blocks away at 2121 Kingsway under a different landlord. He said that while the whole process has been stressful, he doesn’t entirely blame the owner of the original location.

“It has been very difficult and could have been avoided if the landlord had been more receptive but at the same time I understand that when you are threatened by the city, it can be very scary. They did act irrationally by terminating our lease but I need to bury the hatchet and make peace so we can move forward with the business.”

He added that he was grateful for the assistance of Jade Maple, a media and outsourcing company focused on the cannabis industry, in helping get the original Budzilla back in business again.

“Jade Maple has been the corporate management company that takes care of Budzilla’s affairs an they’ve done a lot of helpful services. They take care of my general legal needs and helped us negotiate at the board of variance. What my specialty is is cannabis but when it comes to law and managing, these guys take care of that.”

Rejean Houle Budzilla Board of Variance

Twitter: @flematic
Published at Sat, 10 Dec 2016 22:06:21 +0000

Obama says marijuana should be treated like ‘cigarettes or alcohol’

Obama says marijuana should be treated like ‘cigarettes or alcohol’

The Columbian / Associated Press

In an “exit interview” with Rolling Stone magazine, President Barack Obama said that marijuana use should be treated as a public health issue similar to tobacco or alcohol and called the current patchwork of state and federal laws regarding the drug “untenable.”

“Look, I’ve been very clear about my belief that we should try to discourage substance abuse,” Obama said. “And I am not somebody who believes that legalization is a panacea. But I do believe that treating this as a public-health issue, the same way we do with cigarettes or alcohol, is the much smarter way to deal with it.”

Obama has made comments to this effect before. In a 2014 interview with The New Yorker he said that marijuana was less dangerous than alcohol “in terms of its impact on the individual consumer.” More recently, he told Bill Maher that “I think we’re going to have to have a more serious conversation about how we are treating marijuana and our drug laws generally.”

In the Rolling Stone interview published this week, Obama also reiterated his long-standing position that changing federal marijuana laws is not something the president can do unilaterally. “Typically how these classifications are changed are not done by presidential edict,” he said, “but are done either legislatively or through the DEA. As you might imagine, the DEA, whose job it is historically to enforce drug laws, is not always going to be on the cutting edge about these issues.”

The Drug Enforcement Administration recently turned down a petition to lessen federal restrictions on marijuana, citing the drug’s lack of “accepted medical use” and its “high potential for abuse.” Congress could resolve the conflict between state and federal marijuana laws by amending the federal Controlled Substances Act, but have thus far declined to do so.

Marijuana legalization advocates have been frustrated at what they see as Obama’s unwillingness to use his bully pulpit to advocate for their cause. “It would have been very helpful if he had taken more concrete positive action on this issue before it was almost time to vacate the Oval Office,” said Tom Angell of the pro-legalization group Marijuana Majority in a statement. “That this president didn’t apply pressure on the DEA to reschedule marijuana this year will likely go down as one of the biggest disappointments of the Obama era.”

There’s little disagreement on either side of the legalization debate that personal marijuana use should be treated primarily as a public health issue. Smart Approaches to Marijuana (SAM), the nation’s leading anti-legalization group, says that it “seeks to establish a rational policy” for marijuana use and possession that “no longer relies only on the criminal justice system to address people whose only crime is smoking or possessing a small amount of marijuana.”

But there’s vehement disagreement over what such a “rational policy” might look like. SAM advocates for a policy of decriminalization of marijuana use, but not full-scale commercial legalization. Groups like the Marijuana Policy Project, on the other hand, are pushing for the creation of Colorado-style commercial marketplaces where it’s completely legal to buy, sell and consume marijuana.

Published at Wed, 30 Nov 2016 18:59:57 +0000